Heart devices get a mobile makeover

Emerging diagnostic heart devices are going mobile. And by leveraging advances in smartphones and sensors, they’re able to perform their functions better, faster and cheaper than traditional heart monitoring equipment.

For example, the CADence, shown above, detects blocked arteries from the surface of the chest by identifying the noisy signals of blood turbulence associated with blockages.

The Zio Patch, on the right, is a sensor that can be worn on the chest for up to 14 days to detect intermittent, irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. ZIO-150-90

Both of these amazing devices reveal the mysteries of the heart non invasively, and they provide more potentially life-saving heart data to physicians than conventional equipment.

Yet despite these advantages, adoption into the medical system has been slow.

In the new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine on cardiovascular health, I interview the entrepreneurs behind these inventions — the heart gadgeteers — and let them describe the hurdles that add years to the process of launching new medical devices into the marketplace.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *